Child-Parent Relationships



Child-Parent Relationships

What is it?

Child-Parent Relationships is based on Grade 7 and 8 students in the TDSB who self-reported that they “Rarely” or “Never” talk to their parents about relationships or problems.

Why is it important?

Child well-being requires nurturing relationships and environments. An integral aspect of a nurturing home environment is the quality of the child-caregiver relationship, which can protect against emotional distress, problem behaviours and risk-taking, and can support other positive outcomes such as self-esteem, mental health, and school performance. A child’s ability to talk to a caregiver about relationships and problems is often an indication of a healthy, nurturing, quality relationship.

What does it mean?

Many older children in Toronto do not talk to their parents about relationships and problems. In 2011, 31% of Grade 7 and 8 students said they talk to their parents about problems all the time or often, but almost half said they rarely or never do. Figure 1 shows that students living in Scarborough and North Etobicoke seem to talk to their parents about problems less than students living in the downtown and central North York area. Figure 2 shows that girls talk to their parents about problems more often than boys do. Figure 3 shows that there are cultural differences in how comfortable children feel talking to parents about problems.

Figure 1: Percent of students who rarely or never talk to parents about problems, TDSB (Grades 7 and 8), 2011